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MARTIAL LAW VICTIMS | Jose Dalisay Jr: 'I got out of jail for a day and saw The Godfather'
The online news portal of TV5

Four months after Martial Law was declared, Jose Y. Dalisay Jr. was arrested in January 1973. He was only 18 years old. 

Since he wasn't a novelist--or even an established writer--at that time, he never thought about writing about the experience, Dalisay told in an interview. 

A few days after his arrest, he celebrated his 19th birthday in jail, unsure about his future. 

He then spent his seven-month incarceration at Fort Bonifacio's Yakal Rehabilitation Center in the company of other detainees, including but not limited to student leaders and activists such as Gary Olivar. Olivar, his fraternity brother, would later become the spokesperson of former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo. 

Ten years after being released, Dalisay would later come to terms about the time he spent in jail, producing the award-winning novel Killing Time in a Warm Place