TODAY'S HEADLINES

WATCH | Army chief Año is new AFP chief, pledges loyalty to Duterte 07-Dec-16, 11:39 AM | Jaime Sinapit, InterAksyon.com | With News5 Video Report by Maricel Halili

Duterte won't abandon Marcos, et al despite NBI findings they murdered Espinosa 07-Dec-16, 7:11 PM | Ernie Reyes, InterAksyon.com | JV Arcena, News5

Indonesia quake toll jumps to 97 as more bodies found in rubble 07-Dec-16, 7:05 AM | Chaideer Mahyuddin, Agence France-Presse

SPECIAL REPORT | Burying the Truth: A family challenges the official story of a drug war death 08-Dec-16, 6:56 AM | Clare Baldwin, Andrew R.C. Marshall and Damir Sagolj, Reuters

WATCH | X-ray technician presented as 3rd suspect in US embassy bomb scare 07-Dec-16, 1:12 PM | Perfecto T. Raymundo, Philippine News Agency | Ryan Ang, News5

Najib destroying Malaysia, ‘has to be removed’ - Mahathir 07-Dec-16, 1:19 PM | M Jegathesan, Agence France-Presse

Some Miss U candidates to arrive in PHL on Friday for kickoff party 07-Dec-16, 9:16 PM | Azer N. Parrocha, Philippines News Agency

World

Dengue fever outbreak sickens 7,000 in Costa Rica

Dengue is caused by four strains of virus that are spread by the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

InterAksyon.com
The online news portal of TV5

SAN JOSE - Health officials in Costa Rica said an outbreak of dengue fever has sickened 7,000 people, with many cases occurring in some of this Central American country's most popular tourist areas.

The incidence of illness represents a three-fold increase over this time a year ago, according to Maria Villalta, medical director of national Social Security office, which has been tracking the outbreak.

Most of the cases have been reported along Costa Rica's Pacific Coast, an area popular with foreign tourists. Officials said about 2,500 cases of dengue have been reported there -- eight times more than last year.

Health authorities said they have been baffled by this recent outbreak, which has occurred despite a spate of unusually dry weather. The mosquitoes which carry dengue usually proliferate in times of heavy rain.

Dengue affects between 50 and 100 million people in the tropics and subtropics each year, resulting in fever, muscle and joint ache.

The disease is caused by four strains of virus that are spread by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. There is no vaccine, so medical authorities in the region have been trying to stamp it out by focusing on mosquito control.

The illness can be fatal, developing into hemorrhagic fever which can lead to shock and internal bleeding.

advertisement
OTHER WORLD STORIES
BREAKING NEWS