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US firm plans to build 10 waste-to-energy plants in Philippines through 2013

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MANILA, Philippines - US-based Quantum International plans to build 10 waste-to-energy plants in the Philippines using the company's proprietary plasma technology.

"I like to put up 10 plasma plants in the Philippines that you have so much electricity to export it," said Al Johnson, Quantum president and chief executive officer.

Headquartered in Houston, Quantum is engaged in plasma, biofuels, recycling, mining and property development.

The company's plasma technology involves the gassification and combustion of waste products, which, for every metric ton of garbage, can produce 400 pounds of glass rock, 800 kilowatts to one megawatt of electricity, steam and distilled water.

Johnson said the technology has been used by the US military and in other countries.

In the Philippines, the company plans to put up five plasma waste-to-energy plants within the year, another five in 2013.

The proposed facilities can generate 13,000 megawatts of electricity combined or nearly the country's entire demand, while eliminating the need for landfills, Johnson said.

"We will get rid  of existing landfills and you will never need a new one," he said.

The plasma plants, which Quantum plans to put up on its own, can be constructed in 18 months at a cost of $850 million for a 5,000 ton per day capacity, which is a quarter of the waste produced by Metro Manila alone.