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Furniture trends: Organic and toned down customized pieces with a sense of history

Current trends in the furniture industry were showcased at the Philippine International Furniture Show at SMX Convention Center in Pasay City last March 2016. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

Current trends in the furniture industry were showcased at the Philippine International Furniture Show at SMX Convention Center in Pasay City last March 2016. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

What makes a space—whether it’s a living space or commercial one—stand out or be unique? Perhaps one of those is a carefully curated set of furniture and furnishings.

Showcasing the latest trends, innovative design, and Filipino ingenuity in furniture and furnishing industry, the annual Philippine International Furniture Show (PIFS) was held in SMX Convention Center in Pasay City this March 11 to 13.

Eduardo Zuluaga, overall event chairman of PFIS said in a statement, “PFIS may not be the largest furniture exhibition on the circuit but certainly, is the most exciting, offering a variety of products. This is not a show where you will find rows of the same thing produced by different companies. Our exhibitors, naturally, have their own style. This is a show where individuality and creativity reigns.”

PFIS event chairman Eduardo Zuluaga talks about the current design trends. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

PFIS event chairman Eduardo Zuluaga talks about the current design trends. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

The three-day event featured 60 exhibitors coming from different parts the country including Metro Manila, Pampanga, and some regions in Visayas and Mindanao.

On the current trends in furniture and furnishings, Zuluaga told InterAksyon, “The trends have remained to be natural and organic, and with a story to tell. it has become personal to the buyer. Another one is sense of attachment, or something historical.”

“People are moving away from metallic silver more into gold. In terms of fabric, it’s still more neutral, more toned down, not too lavish and then ostentatious,” he added.

Lighting fixtures by Azcor. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, Interaksyon.com.

Lighting fixtures by Azcor. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, Interaksyon.com.

One exhibitors that showcased pieces with historical attachment is Azcor Lighting Systems, where Zuluaga is also its executive vice-president. Azcor’s lamps and lighting fixtures feature the use of capiz (a kind of local shell) as well as sugarcane bark. The company also opted to veer away from large pieces for commercial use, and instead, created lamps for personal use.

“We’ve made a lot of big lights last year and everybody loved it. We sold to big companies let’s start making lights that they can buy, put it in their room and it will fit,”Zuluaga said, adding that these pieces use LED bulbs, guaranteeing a long life-span of the bulbs.

Hacienda Crafts incorporate indigenous practices in their products. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

Hacienda Crafts incorporate indigenous practices in their products. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

Another exhibitor is the Hacienda Crafts whose handcrafted home accessories like lightings and different housewares are made from local natural materials like buri and coconut twigs. Their items also feature indigenous weaving traditions of Maranao, and of of the T’boli tribe, the Tnalak.

Furniture with detailed wood carvings by Pampanga-based JB Woodcraft Inc. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

Furniture with detailed wood carvings by Pampanga-based JB Woodcraft Inc. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

The tradition of wood carving in Betis, Pampanga can also be seen in the collection of Guagua-based JB Woodcraft Inc. Its collection for PFIS shows how the tradition of wood-carving adapts in contemporary times.

Christina Borromeo Gaston, the company’s associate marketing manager said, “We are doing mostly traditional heacy c arving pieces before but with this show we’re trying to come up with something a little bit fresh so so it’s a mixture of traditional and the contemporary.”

Bon-Ace's collection consists of furniture in geometric patterns and gold motif. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

Bon-Ace’s collection consists of furniture in geometric patterns and gold motif. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

Meanwhile, the gold motif and geometric patterns dominated the collection of Cebu-based company, Bon-Ace. Reimer Jen Bonghanoy, owner, said, “Our inspiration is more on architecture, geometric (patterns) then the use of laser technology into natural materials like sea shells and local stones.”

Vito Selma's collection evokes memories. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

Vito Selma’s collection evokes memories. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

On exploring stories, Vito Selma’s collection made of gmelina wood revolves around memories. According to a representative of the company, the collection is about making memories by creating interactive pieces for end users to have a memory of their product.

Animals and flowers dominate Ann Pamintuan's collection. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

Animals and flowers dominate Ann Pamintuan’s collection. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

On the other hand, the collection of Ann Pamintuan tells the story of Mother Nature with her  wrought iron and stainless steel pieces. Life-size horses, sunflower, leaves, lotus, and gingko leaves are incorporated in her indoor and outdoor furnishings.

Furnishings by Trendsetters International Incorporated provide clever ways to save space. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

Furnishings by Trendsetters International Incorporated provide clever ways to save space. Photo by Romsanne Ortiguero, InterAksyon.com.

Catering to condominium dwellers, Trendsetters International Incorporated offers modern, space-saving furnishings that can make one’s living space not too crowded.

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