False rumors of Mar Roxas leaving Otso Diretso and Liberal Party

April 26, 2019 - 4:51 PM
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Mar Roxas in a campaign
Mar Roxas in a campaign on May 2016. (Facebook/Mar Roxas)

A Facebook screenshot featuring senatorial candidate Mar Roxas allegedly announcing that he is no longer with the Liberal Party has been circulating on social media once again.

A Twitter account shared the screenshot which captured a supposed status of Roxas saying he has withdrawn his inclusion in Otso Diretso, the senatorial slate of the opposition coalition.

It is to be noted, however, that the official page of Roxas on Facebook has a verified mark. His supposed profile on the screenshot does not have one.

Mar Roxas Facebook page
The official Facebook page of senatorial candidate Mar Roxas as seen in this screenshot dated April 26, 2019. It is where he posts updates about his campaign and projects, among others.

 

The manipulated screenshot of Roxas’ supposed status was shared by a Twitter account that shares mostly sketchy content, such as sexually explicit clips.

Other Twitter accounts called him out for sharing the manipulated picture and misleading people.

Another Twitter account claimed that the grammar of Roxas’ supposed status was a “dead giveaway.”

“A person is not a political party,” it stated.

This is not the first time that the senatorial candidate was targeted by “fake news” makers.

Last month, a seemingly pro-Duterte blog claimed that Roxas has left the opposition coalition.

It shared a video where an individual shared a “theory” on why the senatorial candidate has not been publicly appearing with other Otso Diretso members.

The claims were debunked by their campaign manager, Francis “Kiko” Pangilinan, who said that Roxas has never left the coalition.

Earlier this month, Roxas said that he has been absent in campaigns since he attended to the birth of his twins and fetched them from the United States.

Roxas is the candidate from the opposition slate that has figured highest in Pulse Asia and SWS pre-election preference surveys, ranking among the top 12 possible winners before dropping out in the poll conducted in the latter part of March.