PERO KALAHATI PA RIN | Pinoys who agree only poor being killed in Du30 drug war drop 54 pct from 60 pct – SWS

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The body of a man is pictured with a gun under his hand, whom police said was killed during a drug bust operation on "Shabu" (Meth), in Manila, Philippines, August 18, 2016. REUTERS/Ezra Acayan

(UPDATED – 4:20 a.m.) MANILA, Philippines — Although more than half of Filipinos still agree that only poor individuals and not rich people are being killed in the Duterte administration’s war on drugs campaign, the percentage had decreased to 54 percent in September from 60 percent in June this year, based on a survey conducted by the Social Weather Stations (SWS), which was released on Saturday, Oct. 28.

Nationwide, 54 percent of Filipinos agree with the statement, “Hindi pinapatay ang mga mayayaman na drug pusher; ang mga pinapatay ay mahihirap lamang.” They consist of 31 percent, who “strongly agree” with the said statement and 23 percent, who “somewhat agree.”

Meanwhile, 25 percent disagree (12 percent somewhat disagree, 13 percent strongly disagree) that only poor people and not rich ones are being killed in the drug war (12 percent “somewhat disagree” while 13 percent “strongly disagree”), while 21 percent are undecided.

This gives a net agreement score (% agree minus % disagree) of +29, classified by SWS as moderately strong.

READ RELATED STORY: Duterte explains why it’s the ‘pobre’ and not those from ‘Forbes’ who often get killed in drug war

The latest poll is 8 points below, and one grade down from the “very strong” +37 (60 percent agree and 23 percent disagree) survey result in June 2017.

Net agreement that only poor drug pushers are killed was highest in Metro Manila at very strong +49 (70 percent agree, 21 percent disagree) in September 2017. But this is a 12-point decline, and one grade down, from the extremely strong +61 (75 percent agree, 14 percent disagree) in June 2017.

It stayed very strong in Balance Luzon, at +37 (58 percent agree, 21 percent disagree) in September, up by 3 points from +34 (58 percent agree, 24 percent disagree) last June.

Pinoys who say many of those killed in drug war didn’t fight back decrease to 50 percent in Sept. from 54 percent in June

The same September 2017 poll, with 1,500 adult respondents nationwide, show that 50 percent agree that many of those killed in the anti-narcotics drive did not fight back, while 45 percent agree that many of those killed in the same campaign are not really drug dealers.

The 50 percent consist of 22 percent, who “strongly agree” and 29 percent, “who somewhat agree,” correctly rounded. The question posed to respondents was: “Marami sa mga pinatay ng mga pulis sa kampanya laban sa illegal na droga ay hindi totoong nanlaban sa pulis.”

The 23 percent who disagree to the statement above consist of 13 percent, who “somewhat disagree and 10 percent who “strongly disagree.” Meanwhile, 26 percent are undecided.

This gives a net agreement score of moderately strong +27.

This is 7 points below, and one grade down from, the very strong +34 (54 percent agree, 20 percent disagree) in June 2017.

Net agreement that many of those killed in the anti-drug campaign did not really fight back was highest in Metro Manila at a very strong +49 (66 percent agree, 17 percent disagree) in September 2017.

This is 3 points above the very strong +46 (63 percent agreed, 18 percent disagreed, correctly rounded) in June 2017.

It rose by one grade from moderately strong to very strong in the Visayas, at +35 (54 percent agree, 20 percent disagree, correctly rounded) in September, up by 9 points from +26 (49 percent agree, 24 percent disagree, correctly rounded) in June.

It fell by one grade from very strong to moderately strong in Balance Luzon, at +25 (50 percent agree, 25 percent disagree) in September, down by 12 points from +37 (56 percent agree, 19 percent disagree) in June.

Net agreement that many of those killed in the anti-drug campaign did not really fight back was lowest in Mindanao at a moderately strong +10 (38 percent agree, 27 percent disagree, correctly rounded) in September.

This is down by 17 points from the moderately strong +27 (49 percent agree, 22 percent disagree) in June

Pinoys who agree that many of those killed in drug war not really pushers, users down 45 percent in Sept. from 49 percent in June

Results of the same Sept. 2017 poll show that 45 percent of Filipino agree (18 percent strongly agree, 27 percent somewhat agree) that many of those killed by the police in the anti-drug campaign are not really drug dealers or drug pushers.

This is 4 points below the 49 percent who agreed to the statement in June 2017.

Meanwhile, 28 percent disagree (16 percent somewhat disagree, 13 percent strongly disagree, correctly rounded) that many of those killed by the police in the anti-drug campaign are not really drug dealers or drug pushers, while 26 percent are undecided.

This results in a net agreement score of a moderately strong +17, down by 9 points from the moderately strong +26 (49 percent agree, 23 percent disagree) in June 2017.

Net agreement that many of those killed in the anti-drug campaign are not really drug dealers was highest in Metro Manila at a moderately strong +24 (54 percent agree, 30 pecent disagree).

This is a 12-point decline, and one grade down, from the very strong +36 (58 percent agree, 21 percent disagree, correctly rounded) in June 2017.

It stayed moderately strong in the Visayas, at +23 (50 percent agree, 26 percent disagree, correctly rounded) in September, similar to the +25 (52 percent agree, 27 percent disagree) in June.

It also stayed moderately strong in Balance Luzon, at +20 (45 percent agree, 26 percent disagree, correctly rounded) in September, although down by 7 points from +27 (48 percent agree, 20 percent disagree, correctly rounded) in June.

Net agreement that many of those killed in the anti-drug campaign are not really drug dealers was lowest in Mindanao at a low net zero (35 percent agree, 35 percent disagree).

This is an 18-point decline, and one grade down, from the moderately strong +18 (45 percent agree, 27 percent disagree) in June.