WATCH | Japan’s tech show offers vision of connected, robotic future

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Japan’s largest electronics exhibition, CEATEC, has re-branded itself away from consumer electronics, offering a vision of a connected, AI robotic future. Reuter’s Stuart McDill reports.

Japan’s largest electronics show CEATEC – showcasing its version of our future – in a connected world with intelligent robots And cars that know when the driver is falling asleep.

This is Omron’s “Onboard Driving Monitoring Sensor,” checking its driver isn’t distracted.

“We are developing sensors that help the car judge what state the driver is in, with regards to driving. For example, if the driver has his eyes open and set on things he should be looking at, if the driver is distracted or looking at smartphones, and these types of situations,” OMRON Corporation Chief Specialist of Technology, Masaki Suwa, saying.

After 18 years of consumer electronics, CEATEC is changing focus to the Internet of Things and what it calls ‘the ultra-smart community of the future’ A future where machines take on more important roles – machines like Panasonic’s CaloRieco – pop in your plate and know exactly what you are about to consume.

“By placing freshly cooked food inside the machine, you can measure total calories and the three main nutrients: protein, fat and carbohydrate. By using this machine, you can easily manage your diet,” Panasonic staff engineer, Ryota Sato, saying.

Even playtime will see machines more involved – like Forpheus the ping playing robot – here taking on a Olympic bronze medalist – and learning with every stroke.

“It wasn’t any different from playing with a human being. The robot kept improving and getting better as we played, and to be honest, I wanted to play with it when it had reached its maximum level, to see how good it is,” Professional table tennis player and Rio Olympics bronze medalist, Jun Mizutani, saying.

More than a hundred and fifty thousand people are expected to visit CEATEC this week.